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Please submit items to the Calendar of Events by noon Thursday of each week, via e-mail, at calendar@ashevilledailyplanet.com, or fax to 252-6567, or mail c/o The Daily Planet, P.O. Box 8490, Asheville, N.C. 28814-8490. Submissions will be accepted and printed at the discretion of the editor, space permitting. To place an ad for an event, call 252-6565.
Calendar of Events

Wednesday, Feb. 1

STEM LECTURE, 4:30-6 p.m., Room 102-A, Reuter Center, UNC Asheville. A lecture on “The National Centers for Environmental Information and Climate Change” will be given by David Easterling of the NCEI. The STEM lecture series is an interdisciplinary program that covers a wide range of science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines. Each lecture provides the lecturer with the opportunity to share his/her work, present new ideas for feedback, learn new ideas that participants can use, and introduce students to exciting areas to explore. Admission is free and open to the public. 



Friday, Feb. 3

FRIENDS OF NRA DINNER, 6 p.m., Crowne Plaza, 1 Resort Drive, West Asheville. The Friends of the National Rifle Association will host a dinner.  For tickets, which are $45, call Penny Gilliam at 691-0801.

“ALMOST, MAIN” PRODUCTION, 7:30 p.m., 35below (behind and below Asheville Community Theatre), downtown Asheville. The production “Almost, Maine” will run Feb 3-19. “In the mythical town of Almost, Maine, residents find themselves falling in and out of love in unexpected and often hilarious ways,” the ACT noted. The show is produced and directed by Reeni Lindblom Dowd, Performances are at 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and at 2:30 p.m. Sundays. Tickets — at $15 — are available online at www.ashevilletheatre.org or by calling 254-1320 or by visiting the ACT Box Office.

“MURDER ON THE NILE” PRODUCTION, 8 p.m., Diana Wortham Theatre, 2 S. Pack Square, downtown Asheville. Aquila Theatre will present its production of Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Nile.” The show is set on a paddle steamer cruising the legendary Nile River in 1940s’ Egypt. For those wishing to enhance their experience, a pre-show discussion will be held in conjunction with this performance. For tickets, visit www.dwtheatre.com.

YES CONCERT, 9 p.m., Event Center, Harrah’s Cherokee Casino, Cherokee. The band Yes, billed as “pioneers of progressive rock” and “bookmarked” with its 1983 smash hit, “Owner of a Lonely Heart,” will perform in concert. Yes, with a history spanning 45 years and 21 studio albums, is known for its expansive songs, esoteric lyrics, elaborate albums and live stage sets. For tickets, visit www.ticketmaster.




Saturday, Feb. 4

WOLFE LITERARY AWARD EVENT, 4-6 p.m., Top of the Plaze, Asheville Renaissance Hotel, 31 Woodfin St., downtown Asheville. The 61st annual presentation of the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award will honor author Terry Roberts for his work, “That Bright Land.” After the presentation by the Western North Carolina Historical Association, Roberts will provide comments and read excerpts from his novel. The program also will feature readings of excerpts from the works of the four finalists, including Phil Jamisons “Hoedowns, Reels and Frolics,” Randy Johnson’s “Grandfather Mountain,” Robert Morgan’s “Dark Energy,” and Ron Rash’s “Above the Waterfall.” A reception, hosted by the Renaissance, will follow the program. The event is open to the public, but reservations are required. For event tickets, which are $10 for the general public and $5 for WNCHA member, visit wnchistory.org/calendar or call the Smith-McDowell House at 243-9231.

CONCERT/SPEAKER, 7 p.m., Smoky Mountain Center for the Performing Arts,1028 Georgia Rd., Franklin. The Blessed and Unbreakable Tour will feature a concert by Selah and a talk by Missy Robertson, who appears on television’s “Duck Dynasty” and is the author of “Blessed, Blessed... Blessed.” She will be speaking on the story of her family’s fight to love hard, stay strong  and keep the faith when life cannot be fixed. For tickets, which are $18, $20 and $30, visit www.greatmountainmusic.com

SIERRA CLUB MEETING, 7 p.m., Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Asheville, 1 Edwin Place, North Asheville. The local Sierra Club chapter will present Drew Jones of Climate Interactive. Recently returned from the United Nations Climate Summit in Marrakech, Morocco, Jones will use simulations to focus on how various regional actions are combining for success. His talk is titled “Grounded Hope for the Climate.” The event is free and open to the public. 



Saturday, Feb. 4

“MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING” PRODUCTION, 8 p.m., Diana Wortham Theatre, , 2 S. Pack Square, downtown Asheville. Aquila Theatre will present its production of William Shakespeare’s “Much Ado About Nothing.” It is billed by DWT as “a wonderfully intricate and philosophical play centered on the timeless complexities and humor found in courtships.” For tickets, visit www.dwtheatre.com.




Sunday, Feb. 5

ANTI-HATE PROGRAM, 12:30-1:30 p.m., church’s sanctuary, Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the Swannanoa Valley, 500 Montreat Road, Black Mountain. The Social Action Committee of the UUCSV is inviting the congregation and the community to an hour-long conversation and exploration of ‘How To Be An Effective Ally.” The UUCSV added, “With the recent spike of harassment and hate-activity experienced here and around the country, the need is great for folks to stand by those targeted, so no one feels alone in the face of a bigoted remark, workplace discrimination, or outright violence. Our conversation will be led by Monroe Gilmour, who has worked with targets and victims of hate activity for nearly 30 years.” Gilmour will draw on his own work experiences and the Southern Poverty Law Center’s “10 Ways to Fight Hate.” The program is billed as an “important, action-oriented conversation.” Admission is free and open to all.




Monday, Feb. 6

DAVE CHAPPELLE COMEDY SHOW, 7 p.m., U.S. Cellular Center, downtown Asheville. Dave Chappelle will perform his comedy show. No cellphone will be allowed and anyone caught using one inside the venue will be immediately ejected. For tickets, which start at $67.50, visit Ticketmaster.com.




Tuesday, Feb. 7

FLAMENCO PERFORMANCE, 7 p.m., Niswonger Performing Arts Center, Greeneville, Tenn.  Flamenco Vivo, featuring Carolota Santana, will perform. For tickets, visit www.NPACgreeneville.com. 

“IN THE MOOD” MUSICAL REVUE, 7:30 p.m., U.S. Cellular Center, downtown Asheville. “In the Mood,” a 1940s musical revue, will be performed. It is billed as “America’s greatest big-band show” and as “a nostalgic, patriotic, upbeat, sentimental salute to America’s Greatest Generation. For tickets, visit uscellularcenterasheville.com or call 259-5736.




Wednesday, Feb. 8

STEM LECTURE, 4:30-6 p.m., Room 102-A, Reuter Center, UNC Asheville. A lecture on “Climate Resilience in Asheville, N.C—  Moving from ‘Did you know?’ to ‘What can we do about it?’” will be presented by James Fox of the National Centers for Environmental Information. The STEM lecture series is an interdisciplinary program that covers a wide range of science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines. Each lecture provides the lecturer with the opportunity to sharehis/her work, present new ideas for feedback, learn new ideas that participants can use, and introduce students to exciting areas to explore. Admission is free and open to the public. 




Thursday, Feb. 9

NATIVE AMERICAN DISPOSSESSION TALK, noon, Laurel Forum in Karpen Hall, UNC Asheville. Attorney George D. Pappas will address “The Literary and Legal Genealogy of Native American Dispossession: From the Marshall Trilogy to Standing Rock.” The talk, part of UNCA’s American Indian and Indigenous Studies Series, is free and open to the public.

STATE/NATIONAL POLITICAL REVIEW , 6:30 p.m., Gondolier Restaurant, 1360 Tunnel Road, Asheville. The Blue Ridge Republican Women’s Club will host Dr. Chris Cooper, a professor and head of the Department of Political Science and Public Affairs at Western Carolina University. He will address state and national politics — and answer political questions.




Friday, Feb. 10

BOOTH BROTHERS CONCERT, 7:30 p.m., Smoky Mountain Center for the Performing Arts,1028 Georgia Rd., Franklin. The Booth Brother will perform in concert. For tickets, which are $20, visit www.greatmountainmusic.com




Saturday, Feb. 11

JOURNEY TRIBUTE CONCERT, 7:30 p.m., The Foundation Performing Arts Center, Isothermal Community College, Spindale.  Resurrection, a Journey Tribute, will perform in concert. Resurrection is billed as combining “incredible musicianship and vocal precision (and appearance) of the legendary Steve Perry. Every show features one brilliant hit single after another, providing an all-ages, family-friendly show fused into a powerful rock ‘n’ roll concert experience.” Journey’s top commercial success occurred between 1978 and 1987, with Perry as its lead singer. During that period, Journey released a series of hit songs, including “Don’t Stop Believin’” (1981), which in 2009 became the top-selling track in iTunes history among songs not released in the 21st century. Another major Perry classic is “Oh Sherrie,” which was recorded in 1984 on Perry’s first solo album, but is credited as a Journey “honorary” song. For tickets, which are $20 and $25 (and $8 for youths), visit www.FoundationShows.org. or call 286-9990.



Wednesday, Feb. 15

AUTHOR TIMOTHY TYSON EVENT, 6 p.m., Malaprop’s Bookstore/Café, 55 Haywood St., downtown Asheville. Award-winning author Timothy Tyson will discuss and sign his new book, “The Blood of Emmett Till.” The book uses a range of sources — including the only interview ever given by Carolyn Bryant, along with her unpublished memoir — to tell what is billed as “the definitive story” of the 1955 lynching by whites of 14-year-old Emmett Till, an African-American from Chicago who was visiting relatives in the Mississippi Delta. The book shows how black power and a mother’s courage confronted the atrocities inherent in America’s enduring racial caste system.Till’s mother’s insistence on an open casket, as well as African American self-assertion in Chicago, spurred nationwide protests that turned this local atrocity into a global symbol of American injustice; it transformed civil rights from a Southern issue into a national movement. Tyson is senior research scholar at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, visiting professor of American Christianity and Southern Culture at Duke Divinity School, and adjunct professor of American Studies at the University of North Carolina. He is also the author of “Blood Done Sign My Name,” a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, winner of the Southern Book Award for Nonfiction and the Grawemeyer Award in Religion, among others; and Radio Free Dixie: Robert F. Williams and the Roots of Black Power, winner of the James Rawley Prize for best book on race and the Frederick Jackson Turner Prize for best first book in U.S. History from the Organization of American Historians. He serves on the executive board of the North Carolina NAACP. Admission is free and open to the public.

“NEW JIM CROW” BOOK DISCUSSION GROUP, 6:30 p.m., Firestorm Books & Coffee, 610 Haywood Road, West Asheville. Firestorm will host the last in a series of discussions of Michelle Alexander’s book, “The New Jim Crow.” The discussion will be led by Eryka Lynn Peskin. Admission is free and all are welcome.




Thursday, Feb. 16

CREATION CARE ALLIANCE GENERAL MEETING, 5:30-7 p.m., Room MB306, First Baptist Church of Asheville in which is upstairs. Address is 5 Oak Street in downtown Asheville. The Creation Care Alliance of WNC will hold a general meeting to inspire one another to do good work and discuss the group’s work empowering care for creation. Attendees will connect with one another and explore ways to care for creation. Everyone is welcome. 

CAMILLE A. BROWN & DANCERS SHOW, 8 p.m., Diana Wortham Theatre, , 2 S. Pack Square, downtown Asheville. Camille A. Brown and Dancers will perform in 8 p.m. shows on Feb. 16 and 17.  DWT touts Brown as “small but mighty” — as a “spitfire dancer and choreographer.” For tickets, visit www.dwtheatre.com.




Friday, Feb. 17

DEATH CAFE SERIES, 5-6:30 p.m., Reuter Center, UNC Asheville. Death Café, a series of gatherings for discussion, storytelling and exploration of ideas and feelings about death will feature faciltators Karen Sanders, Greg Lathrop and Sa’id Osio of the group Third Messenger. Admission is free and open to the public.

ANNIE MOSES BAND CONCERT, 7:30 p.m., Niswonger Performing Arts Center, Greeneville, Tenn. The Annie Moses Band will perform in concert. For tickets, visit www.NPACgreeneville.com.




 

Saturday, Feb. 18

CARPENTERS TRIBUTE CONCERT, 7:30 p.m., Smoky Mountain Center for the Performing Arts, 1028 Georgia Rd., Franklin. A tribute concert, “We’ve Only Just Begin: Carpenters Remembered,” will be performed. For tickets. which are $20 and $25, visit www.greatmountainmusic.com.

 



Sunday, Feb. 19

MORAL COMPASS PRESENTATION, 2-3:30 p.m., Friends Meeting House, 227 Edgewood Road, North Asheville. Bill Walz will address “Keeping a Moral Compass when Society seems to have Lost its Own” during the monthly meeting of the Ethical Humanist Society of Asheville. Walz will discuss “his insights on how to hold a steady compass in these historic and frightening times,” the EHSA noted in a news release. “What is needed and what can we do? The topic and discussion will be welcome by those deeply concerned by the divisive rhetoric of the past election and those fearing erosion of many hard-fought rights (voting rights, civil rights, environmental responsibility, equality, reproductive rights, labor rights, health access and quality education for all).” An informal discussion and refreshments will follow the presentation. Walz has evolved from a career as a clinical psychologist into teaching meditation and evolving consciousness as a path to personal healing and growth. All are welcome to attend.

 



Friday, Feb. 24

“BUS STOP” PRODUCTION, 7:30 p.m., 35below (behind and below Asheville Community Theatre), downtown Asheville. The Autumn Players’ Readers Theatre Showcase Series’ production of “Bus Stop” will run Feb 24-25 at 34below. “An assortment of quintessentially mid-Western characters from the 1950s become stranded in a diner, gradually letting down their guards to reveal their private dreams and secrets to one other,” ACT noted of the production. It is directed by RoseLynn Katz. The production also will be presented at 2:30 p.m. Feb. 26 at UNC Asheville’s Reuter Center. Tickets — at $6 — are available online at www.ashevilletheatre.org or by calling 254-1320 or by visiting the ACT Box Office. All remaining tickets will be sold at the door.

MICHAEL BOLTON CONCERT, 9 p.m., Event Center, Harrah’s Cherokee Casino, Cherokee. Grammy Award-winning singer-songerwriter Michael Bolton will perform in concert. For tickets, visit www.ticketmaster. 

 



Saturday, Feb. 25

MLK JR. PRAYER BREAKFAST, 9 a.m., Camp Dorothy Walls, 495 Fragment Road, Black Mountain.The 27th Annual Swannanoa Valley Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Prayer Breakfast will be held. The breakfast will feature a speaker (to be announced) who will share the life and teachings of King “as we strive to bring knowledge and awareness of his work to our Swannanoa Valley community,” the event organizers noted. Tickets may be purchased online, or pay by check with a ticket order form at http://svmlk.org/mlk-prayer-breakfast.html.

RHONDA VINCENT AND THE RAGE CONCERT, 7:30 p.m., Niswonger Performing Arts Center, Greeneville, Tenn. Rhonda Vincent and the Rage will perform in concert. For tickets, visit www.NPACgreeneville.com.

SOLAS CONCERT, 8 p.m., Diana Wortham Theatre, 2 S. Pack Square, downtown Asheville. The five-person band Solas will perform in concert.  Solas is dubbed as “Irish-America’s most influential band” by National Public Radio’s “The Thistle and Shamrock.” For tickets, visit www.dwtheatre.com.

 



Tuesday, Feb. 28

LADYSMITHMAMBAZO CONCERT, 8 p.m., Diana Wortham Theatre, , 2 S. Pack Square, downtown Asheville. Ladysmith Black Mambazo, a South African male a cappella group that sings in the vocal styles of isicathamiya and mbube, will perform in concert. The four-time Grammy Award-winning octet is touted as “the greatest exporter of South Africa’s rich musical traditions.” For more than 50 years, the group has been known for its uplifting vocal harmonies, signature dance moves and charming onstage banter. For tickets, visit www.dwtheatre.com.

 




Wednesday, March 1

STEM LECTURE, 4:30-6 p.m., Room 102-A, Reuter Center, UNC Asheville. The lecture, “Accelerating Climate Innovation,” will be presented by James McMahon of The Collider.  The STEM lecture series is an interdisciplinary program that covers a wide range of science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines. Each lecture provides the lecturer with the opportunity to share his/her work, present new ideas for feedback, learn new ideas that participants can use, and introduce students to exciting areas to explore. Admission is free and open to the public. 

 



Friday, March 3

NITTY GRITTY DIRT BAND CONCERT, 7:30 p.m., Smoky Mountain Center for the Performing Arts, 1028 Georgia Rd., Franklin. The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band will perform in concert. For tickets, which are $24, $28 and $32, visit www.greatmountainmusic.com.

 



Saturday, March 4

BEATLES TRIBUTE CONCERT, 7:30 p.m., Niswonger Performing Arts Center, Greeneville, Tenn. “‘1964’... The Tribute” show will perform in a concert saluting the Beatles. For tickets, visit www.NPACgreeneville.com.

 


Friday, March 10

THE DRIFTERS CONCERT, 7:30 p.m., The Foundation Performation Arts Center, Isothermal Community College, Spindale. A show titled “The Drifters Rock and Roll Hall of Famers,” will feature four performers emulating the moves and singing the songs of theThe Drifters, a long-popular rhythm and blues vocal group. For tickets, which are $25 and $30, visit www.FoundationShows.org. 

 



Saturday, March 11

ORGANIC GROWERS SCHOOL, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., various locations around campus at UNCA (see signs, posted around campus or check schedule on Internet). The Organic Growers School Spring Conference — running March 11-12 — will offer what is billed as practical, regionally appropriate workshops on organic growing, permaculture, homesteading, urban farming, and rural living plus a trade show, seed exchange, silent auction, children’s program and pre-conference, on-farm events.More than 70 sessions per day will feature themed tracks including gardening, soils, livestock, primitive skills, permaculture, herbs, alternative energy, sustainable forestry, homesteading, cooking, poultry, farmers I and farmers II, mushrooms and food resilience. Registration is required. To register, visit http://organicgrowersschool.org/spring-conference-registration/.

 



Friday, March 17

DEATH CAFE SERIES, 5-6:30 p.m., Reuter Center, UNC Asheville. Death Café, a series of gatherings for discussion, storytelling and exploration of ideas and feelings, about death, will feature faciltators Karen Sanders, Greg Lathrop and Sa’id Osio of the group Third Messenger. Admission is free and open to the public.

 




Saturday, March 25

ARTISTS’ REHAPPENING, 3-10 p.m., Camp Rockmont, 375 Lake Eden Rd., Black Mountain. Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center will hold its seventh annual (Re)HAPPENING, inspired by John Cage’s 1952 “Theatre Piece No. 1,” an unscripted performance at Black Mountain College considered by many to be the first “happening.” The event will offer two international projects, alongside a roster of 18 local installation, new media, music and performance projects, with environmental lighting by students of the Odyssey Community School. Food trucks will be available on site. A parking pass will cost $5, while a roundtrip shuttle pass from downtown Asheville will cost $5. For event tickets, which are $20 for advance adults and $25 for regular admission adults, visit This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

RODNEY CARRINGTON CONCERT, 7:30 p.m., Event Center, Harrah’s Cherokee Casino, Cherokee. Rodney Carrington will perform in concert. For tickets, visit www.ticketmaster.

 



Friday, March 31

MICKEY GILLEY CONCERT, 7:30 p.m., Smoky Mountain Center for the Performing Arts, 1028 Georgia Rd., Franklin. Mickey Gilley will perform in concert. For tickets, which are $24 and $28, visit www.greatmountainmusic.com.

 




Thursday, April 6

BEACH BOYS CONCERT, 7:30 p.m., Smoky Mountain Center for the Performing Arts, 1028 Georgia Rd., Franklin. Mickey Gilley will perform in concert. For tickets, which are $45, $50 and $55, visit www.greatmountainmusic.com.

 



Saturday, April 29

ALICE COOPER CONCERT, 7:30 p.m., Event Center, Harrah’s Cherokee Casino, Cherokee. Alice Cooper will perform in concert. Cooper, a singer, songwriter and actor, has performed for more than five decades. “With his distinctive raspy voice and a stage show that features guillotines, electric chairs, fake blood, deadly snakes, baby dolls, and dueling swords, Cooper is considered by music journalists and peers alike to be ‘The Godfather of Shock Rock,’” according to Wikipedia. “He has drawn equally from horror films, vaudeville, and garage rock to pioneer a macabre and theatrical brand of rock designed to shock people.” For tickets, visit www.ticketmaster.com.




Last Updated on Thursday, 02 February 2017 12:51
 



 


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